A Pussyhat Tale

A Pussyhat Tale

Shortly after the announcement that a Women’s March on Washington was being organized for the day after the Trump inauguration to protest the sexist and racist rhetoric of the US election cycle, there emerged a supportive Pussyhat Project. Bright pink Pussyhats served various functions: a very visible symbol of unity and protest, demonstrating the power of local and handmade work that is part of women’s traditional labour, they also kept people warm at the January march. In addition they provided solidarity, in the making and the wearing, for people who could not attend the March. The concept of the Pussyhat Project and original – very simple – patterns for knitting and crochet were the work of Krista Suh and Jayna Zweiman from Los Angeles, but many different patterns became available on-line, and the designers encouraged experimentation and variation.
 
A Pussyhat Tale follows the construction of over 40 pussyhats by Catherine Hundleby and her friends in Windsor before and during Catherine’s trip with a group of friends to DC for the WMW. They were named the “flying sisters” by the women who went to the march by bus from Windsor because most of them traveled by plane. Jill Singleton-Jackson organized the flying sisters with assistance from Tova Perlmutter in arranging housing in Baltimore. The group of twelve were: Catherine, Jill, Kimberley Babb, Lori Buchanan, Audrey Jackson, Claire Jackson, Kathryn LaFreniere, Eleanor Maticka-Tyndale, Monica Mehan, and Shelagh Towson, all from Windsor; Lori’s sister, Nancy Buchanan, and their friend Katrin Casada joined from Switzerland.
 
Hats crocheted and knitted by: Catherine Hundleby, Lori Buchanan, Charissa Varma, Jodi House, andal lopez, and Jodi Green.
 
Photo credits: Catherine Hundleby, Jill Singleton-Jackson, Claire Jackson, Charissa Varma, and several anonymous